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Published: 2014-01-03 00:06:23

In June of 2013, a 29-year-old former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor named Edward Snowden leaked classified documents to journalists, revealing the extent of the US government’s surveillance practices. The documents showed that the government was collecting vast amounts of data on both American citizens and foreign nationals, including phone records, internet activity, and more.

The revelations made by Snowden had a profound impact on data privacy in 2013. Many Americans were shocked to learn that the government was collecting such a large amount of data, and that their personal information may have been included in that data. The news sparked a national conversation about privacy and surveillance, with many calling for greater transparency and accountability from the government.

One of the most controversial aspects of the NSA’s surveillance practices was the collection of phone records. The government was collecting metadata on millions of phone calls made in the US, including the numbers dialed, the time and duration of the calls, and more. While the government claimed that this was necessary for national security purposes, many argued that it was a violation of privacy and civil liberties.

The internet was also a target of government surveillance. The NSA was collecting data on the online activities of both Americans and foreign nationals, including email metadata and browsing history. This led to concerns about government overreach and the potential for abuse of power.

The public reaction to these revelations was mixed. Some people were outraged by the government’s actions and called for greater protections for privacy and civil liberties. Others argued that the surveillance was necessary for national security and that the government was within its rights to collect this data.

In response to the public outcry, the government made some changes to its surveillance practices. In 2015, Congress passed the USA Freedom Act, which ended the government’s bulk collection of phone metadata. The act also required greater transparency and oversight of government surveillance activities.

However, many people feel that these changes did not go far enough. There are still concerns about government surveillance and the potential for abuse of power. Many argue that more needs to be done to protect the privacy and civil liberties of American citizens.

The NSA scandal had a significant impact on data privacy in 2013. The revelations made by Edward Snowden sparked a national conversation about privacy and surveillance, and led to changes in government policies. However, many people feel that more needs to be done to protect privacy and civil liberties, and the debate over government surveillance continues to this day.

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